nuetrons:

coochiewalliwallie:

cumprise:

yahoneydip:

This fucking woman

omg

Baddie

goals

(via theramblingsofahopefulwriter)


sourcedumal:

notfknapplicable:

IMPORTANT : I just wanna point out that its STEVE who gets the flirting started between him and Sam at the beginning of the movie.  Sam is just moseying around the mall, going for his run, and this hot guy continually blazes past him had just has to rub it in that he’s totally outrunning him.  And then it’s Steve who stops to chat, makes a teasing little comments, offers friendly competition, and then THIS SHIT RIGHT HERE.  “Oh, that’s how it is?”  Steve, you tryin’ to fuck.  We see right through you.

As the movie progresses, it’s always Steve that seeks Sam out.  He goes to the VA to visit him (just to visit, apropos of nothing), shows up at his fucking apartment when how does Steve know where Sam lives? 

Upon my initial viewing of Cap 2 I really saw it as Sam fawning over Steve, but when I think about it, they’re definitely in mutual like but it’s really Steve that’s got a crush on Sam.  Wants him in his life.  I think the fandom has caught on to this as well because the influx of fic I’ve been reading features a lot of Steve being the aggressor towards Sam, and I like that.  I love it.  I want some more of it.

the bolded is the most important sentence in that whole thing yo

(via inkteller)


I’m afraid I’ll never finish college. I’m afraid I’ll finish college with student loans I can never pay back. I’m afraid I’ll get a degree and won’t be able to find a job in that field. I’m afraid I’ll get a degree, get the job I dreamed of, and hate it.
A Mental Illness Happy Hour listener whose list of fears matches mine four for four. Glad I’m not the only one.
(via mcmexican)

(via pussyfordinner)


strugglingtobeheard:

cynique:

popculturebrain:

Leading Men Age, Leading Women Don’t | Vulture

There are more charts if you click through.

I’m so glad this info graphic is going around, because so many people don’t realize how ageism and misogyny play hand in hand and how the sexualization of young girls play into this.

and how absolutely normalized it is via media such as popular film

(via hardcockforhitchcock)


magicalbeautifulkibi:

ive-been-tired:

kuneria:

Bob Ross used to be a drill sergeant but quit because he hated having to shout at people. 

(via theramblingsofahopefulwriter)


dianaspot:

(x)

Absolutely spot on!

(via dailydoseofsquee)


vablatsky:

this game is why I have trust issues

(via stitchnerd)


huffingtonpost:

Homeless shelter is transformed into 5-star restaurant, hot food and warm hearts all around.  See the full video here. 

(via theramblingsofahopefulwriter)


littlelotte88:

feenybobeany:

sometimes i look at people on my dash and i think

who the fuck are you

when did i follow you

you’re not posting things relative to my interests

but i can’t unfollow you becasue i can’t remember why i did

it might have been important

This is the most accurate post I have ever seen on here.

(via inryannewetrust)


We praise people for being “naturally” smart, too, “naturally” athletic, and etc. But studies continue to show, as they have for some time now, that it is generally healthier to praise schoolchildren for being hardworking, than for being naturally gifted. We know now that to emphasize a child’s inherent ability places pressure on that child to continue to be accidentally talented, which is something that is hard for anyone to control. When the children who are applauded for their natural skills fail, they are shown to take the failure very personally. After all, the process of their success has always seemed mysterious and basic and inseparable from the rest of their identity, so it must be they who are failing as whole people. When students are instead complimented and rewarded for their effort and improvement, they tend to not be so hard on themselves. When they fail, they reason, “Well, I’ll work harder next time.” They learn that they are capable of success, rather than constantly automatically deserving of it, and they learn simultaneously that they are bigger and more complex than their individual successes or failures.

Kate of Eat the Damn Cake, The Stupidity of “Natural” Beauty (via theimperfectascent)

I lost whole years of my life to self-loathing and self-sabotaging because I couldn’t sustain being ‘gifted’.  Don’t make the same mistake.

(via mossonhighheels)

This is so, so important for teachers to understand. I try, in every report card, to focus on effort, not natural ability. And you know what? It makes a big difference in my classroom.

(via sanityscraps)

That bolded bit above, that was me as well.

(via bspolitics)

(via stagekatz)